God new evidence

GOD: new evidence

Contents

The Queen's Seal

'Just Stories?' #06

What's in the series?      Previous: King David      Next: The British Museum

More and more names are coming to light in the archaeological record which confirm that what we read in the Bible concerns real people, real history and real events.

Some of these finds are debatable. A good example would be the Jezebel seal. A seal carried the impression of someone’s name. It could be stamped into clay as a mark of ownership. One seal came to light in the 1960s and is now in the Israel Museum, that bears the unusual consonants Z, B, L. This indicates a Phoenician name.

Part of the seal is broken off, so it is difficult to reconstruct the full name, but the most likely contender - particularly given the beauty and the value of this seal - is Jezebel the Queen. If it is right, this reconstruction means that we can hold in our hands a seal that was made at the time of Queen Jezebel, bearing her name, and reminding us thousands of years later that we are talking about a real person from a real time in history (around 860 BC. See the Bible, 1 Kings chapters 16-21)

With Dr. Chris Sinkinson, lecturer in Old Testament and Apologetics at Moorlands college.

To discuss this video please visit www.facebook.com/godnewevidence.

 

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